Systems thinking and regulatory governance (5): Epistemic and ethical challenges

We have reached the end of this series of blog posts on systems thinking and its application in regulatory governance scholarship. If you are tuning in just now, then I strongly recommend reading the earlier posts first: a broad introduction to the series, an exploration of the history of systems thinking, examples of systems thinking … Continue reading Systems thinking and regulatory governance (5): Epistemic and ethical challenges

Systems thinking and regulatory governance (4): Evidence and findings

We now have a good understanding of the breadth and depth of systems thinking and its possible role in regulatory governance and practice. We have also seen some examples of how systems thinking has inspired scholars in studying regulatory governance and practice. It is now time to gain some understanding of the evidence and findings … Continue reading Systems thinking and regulatory governance (4): Evidence and findings

Systems thinking and regulatory governance (3): Examples of systems thinking in regulatory scholarship

In the previous blog post, we have looked at how systems thinking may help to develop more effective and just regulatory governance and practice. We found that various trajectories of systems thinking exist and that they can be used side by side in regulatory reform. In this blog post, we will look at some examples … Continue reading Systems thinking and regulatory governance (3): Examples of systems thinking in regulatory scholarship

Systems thinking and regulatory governance (2): The evolution of systems thinking

Capturing the evolution of systems thinking and systems science is all but easy. Conventional scientific methods for unpacking and understanding historical developments often fall short of capturing the non-linearity, emergence, different worldviews, and role of feedback that have affected the different trajectories of systems thinking over the last hundred years, or so. In this blog … Continue reading Systems thinking and regulatory governance (2): The evolution of systems thinking

Systems thinking and regulatory governance (1): A review of the international academic literature

Regulatory system. It seems such a benign term that it hardly warrants attention. Or does it? The term was used over 1,300 times in New Zealand newspapers since the year 2000.[1] Among the more expressive uses are the following headlines: “Commission slams regulatory system” (Waikato Times, 14 March 2014)“Report a damning indictment of regulatory system” … Continue reading Systems thinking and regulatory governance (1): A review of the international academic literature

Risk governance and risk-based regulation review: Now available as open access paper

In regulatory governance and regulatory practice, ‘risk’ is probably one of the topics most talked about and least understood. The notion of risk is like the notion of time or happiness: we all know perfectly well what it is, until we try to explain it to others (or to ourselves, for that matter). Risk is … Continue reading Risk governance and risk-based regulation review: Now available as open access paper

Risk governance and risk-based regulation(6): Epistemic and ethical challenges

We are nearing the end of this series of blog posts on risk governance and risk-based regulation. It builds on a systematic review of over 150 academic publications published between 2009 and 2018. The aim of the series is to introduce those working in a regulatory environment to the key concepts of risk governance and … Continue reading Risk governance and risk-based regulation(6): Epistemic and ethical challenges