Risk governance and risk-based regulation(3): The International Risk Governance Council Framework

Inspired by the insights from risk studies, governments around the world have begun to develop and implement risk governance and risk-based regulation. Following these developments, scholars have begun to map, explore and interrogate risk governance models and strategies, risk-based regulatory approaches and instruments, and their performance. There appears no area where governments have not trialled … Continue reading Risk governance and risk-based regulation(3): The International Risk Governance Council Framework

Risk governance and risk-based regulation(2): The evolution of risk

It is safe to say that humankind has always been subject to risk. For long, however, humans have considered risk along the lines of fate and determinism. Our ancient ancestors thought of risk as something they could not influence. Their future was either set in stone, regulated by the forces of nature, or regulated by … Continue reading Risk governance and risk-based regulation(2): The evolution of risk

Risk governance and risk-based regulation(1): A review of the international academic literature

Previously, the use of insights from the behavioural sciences in regulatory practice had a central focus on this blog. This has resulted in a series of blog posts (episode 1, episode 2, episode 3, and episode 4) and a research paper discussing the core insights from the international academic literature on this topic published between … Continue reading Risk governance and risk-based regulation(1): A review of the international academic literature

Exploring issues about regulation: regulatory capture and bias

The following post was written by Keith Manch, the Chief Executive and Director of Maritime New Zealand. He has worked in the public sector since 1977 and brings extensive leadership experience in a number of policy and operational senior leadership positions in regulation, compliance and response. In my first article (Regulation - the staff of life) … Continue reading Exploring issues about regulation: regulatory capture and bias

Brief book review – Risk Management and Governance: Concepts, Guidelines and Applications

Terje Aven and Ortwin Renn, 2010, Springer, 276 pages. Professor Terje Aven (University of Stavanger) and Professor Ortwin Renn (Potsdam Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies) are two leading risk theorists and (regulatory) researchers. They have been studying risk, risk governance and risk management for well over two decades. In Risk Management and Governance: Concepts, Guidelines … Continue reading Brief book review – Risk Management and Governance: Concepts, Guidelines and Applications

(Bread, rice, potatoes and) Regulation – the staff of life, by Keith Manch

The following post was written by Keith Manch, the Chief Executive and Director of Maritime New Zealand. He has worked in the public sector since 1977 and brings extensive leadership experience in a number of policy and operational senior leadership positions in regulation, compliance and response. Regulation is a necessary part of our lives, just … Continue reading (Bread, rice, potatoes and) Regulation – the staff of life, by Keith Manch

Brief book review – Risk Regulation and Administrative Constitutionalism

Elizabeth Fisher, 2010, Hart Publishing, 290 pages. Professor Elizabeth Fisher (University of Oxford) presents a fresh reading of and engagement with the risk governance and risk regulation literature in Risk Regulation and Administrative Constitutionalism. Her starting point is that too often this literature is concerned with either the democratic decision-making process or the scientific decision-making … Continue reading Brief book review – Risk Regulation and Administrative Constitutionalism